South Mississippi activists speak out on Breonna Taylor case decision

“It wasn’t the fact that she was killed, it wasn’t the fact that they used bullets to kill her, it was the fact that the bullets could’ve gone anywhere else." said Daniels.

South Mississippi activists speak out on Breonna Taylor case decision

GULFPORT, Miss. (WLOX) - From Louisville to Los Angeles, Atlanta and New York, cities across the U.S. are bracing for another night of potential protests following the decision not to charge the three officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor.

In South Mississippi, protests have been peaceful and the organizers responsible for the most recent peaceful protests on the Gulf Coast worry about the future.

Tabari Daniels has been talking to the masses across the radio waves ever since he was 17. When he heard the news of the decision on the Breonna Taylor case, it meant more to him than race.

“First of all I’m the father of a daughter. So, obviously, Breonna Taylor could’ve been my daughter. I’m, also a son. Breonna Taylor could’ve been my mother. When you talk about being taught to be chivalrous, and a gentleman, and hearing something as heinous as what transpired with Breonna happen, then it hits you very deep, aside from race, just as a man." said Daniels.

Factoring race into the equation, Daniels fears what the decision said to America’s black population.

“The officer that was charged, was charged because of the bullets that did not kill Breonna Taylor. Think about that. It wasn’t the fact that she was killed, it wasn’t the fact that they used bullets to kill her, it was the fact that the bullets could’ve gone anywhere else," said Daniels. “What other way can you show a person, or a people, that when it comes to the social contract of America, that they really don’t count, like they’re not even recognized.”

Jeffrey Hulum, III has spoken out about equality on the Gulf Coast numerous of times and he said there’s only one way to fix it.

“Your district attorneys are elected positions. Your attorney generals are an elected position. If you want to fix anything, you have to fix the broken systematic justice system as a whole," said Hulum. “You fix that by voting. You vote these people in, you vote these people out. The people who do not vote are just as guilty as the people who commits these crimes in the badge of honor.”

Hancock County NAACP President Greg Barabino has also been very vocal and he said people are too focused on the 'what’ and not the ‘why’ of what happened to Breonna Taylor.

“The underlying issue is that Black people in America do not have the benefit of the doubt in the justice system and during police interactions," Barabino said. “When we are victims of brutality or murder, our character is put on trial to justify the murder. The education system, judicial system, and the media feeds America negative narratives of Black people and men and women of all of all groups perceive Black people as something of less value. Breonna Taylor is not dead because of police procedure. Breonna is dead because of the culture in America that put those tactical measures in place.”

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