NAACP Leader Says He Won't Call For A Boycott - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

STATE FLAG CONTROVERSY

NAACP Leader Says He Won't Call For A Boycott

National NAACP President Kweisi Mfume said it's been more than 100 years since the Civil War, but there's still a vexing issue of bigotry and hatred in Mississippi. This civil rights leader said the onus is on the state legislature to do something about April's flag vote.

"We call on Mississippians and even more so the leadership that resides in this building to work in a way that really suggests leadership, and not accept this and say 'Well there's nothing we can do,'" Mfume said.

Since Mississippians overwhelmingly voted to keep the current state flag with the confederate battle emblem, Mfume said the NAACP isn't sure if there will be economic actions against the state, calling it unpredictable. However, he did say the association will be closely watching the legislature.

Speaker Pro Tem Robert Clark does not see the legislature taking any action on the issue any time soon.

"I don't care what we go up there and vote on as a legislature, if two-thirds of the people of the state of Mississippi voted for something or against it to put in the constitution, the constitution takes precedent over any legislation that we can pass," Clark said.

Gov. Ronnie Musgrove said the meeting was a step forward in that it opened up dialog about the issue. But Musgrove agrees with Speaker Pro Tem Clark.

"As I told Mr. Mfume, the people of Mississippi have spoken. The issue was put before them, and they spoke. I respect the will of the people," Musgrove said.

The two leaders do not have any more meetings planned. The NAACP will hold its annual convention in New Orleans this weekend. Mfume said his meeting with Musgrove will be discussed.

 

  • STATE FLAG CONTROVERSYMore>>

  • NAACP WILL NOT BOYCOTT... FOR NOW

    Coast Is Business As Usual

    While the NAACP will be keeping an eye on the state legislature, coast tourism and economic leaders are keeping an eye on any possible backlash. The coast has enjoyed an economic explosion, of sorts, over the last several years, and any group that could threaten that continued growth must be taken seriously, but for the time being it's business as usual in South Mississippi. More >>
Powered by Frankly