Hancock County residents enjoy the calm before the storm - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Hancock County residents enjoy the calm before the storm

Officials are already manning the Hancock County EOC ahead of Alberto. (Photo source: WLOX) Officials are already manning the Hancock County EOC ahead of Alberto. (Photo source: WLOX)
Sandbag locations are open across the coast for residents worried about flooding from Alberto. The bags and sand are free, but you will have to fill them yourself. (Photo source: WLOX) Sandbag locations are open across the coast for residents worried about flooding from Alberto. The bags and sand are free, but you will have to fill them yourself. (Photo source: WLOX)
HANCOCK COUNTY, MS (WLOX) -

While officials in Hancock County spent their Saturday preparing for whatever Alberto may bring, residents enjoyed another day in the sun while keeping an eye on the forecast.

The Hancock County Emergency Management Operations Center was quiet, but EMA Director Brian Adam was watching Alberto closely.

"Right now, our preparations are we have sandbag locations open, people have gone to get some," Adam said. "We're manning EOC for most of the day."

LIST: Where you can find and fill sandbags in South Mississippi

For many Hancock County residents, one more day of fun was on the schedule before worrying about the storm. Hundreds made their way to the Waveland for the second day of the St. Claire Seafood Festival.

Bay St. Louis resident Jimmy Ladner spent some time at the festival but also knows what needs to be done before the storm reaches the coast.

"We do what everyone else is doing, I hope," Ladner said. "We're watching it. We're monitoring where it's at. As it gets closer we'll expand our preparations by doing what needs to be done. Picking up things in the yard. We'll make sure we have enough water. We'll make sure we have enough flashlights and batteries and stuff like that."

Many people in Hancock County said they're watching the storm and will wait to see what it's going to do before making any long-term plans. Meanwhile, others have already begun moving their vehicles to higher ground.

"If it goes in where they're saying we could end up with one to three feet above normal, which we see that quite often," Adam said. "Most people living in the low land know what to do."

Jay Fountain says it's not just about saving vehicles and buildings, but also paperwork and historic pieces.

"We go there and pick up all our important papers and anything that's really meant something to us and we put it all in the attic," Fountain said.

Most of the people we spoke to at the St. Claire Seafood Festival said even an early season storm is something they feel prepared for. 

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