Daylight Saving Time means less sleep: How your health is impacted

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(File)

SOUTH MISSISSIPPI (WLOX) - If you didn't set your clocks forward before you went to bed Saturday, do it now. Daylight Saving Time kicked in overnight.

FUN FACT

Congress passed the legislation for Daylight Saving Time 100 years ago this year.

HOW YOUR HEALTH IS IMPACTED

You may not be feeling that extra yet but the small change can be a big deal for your health. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, many people are not getting enough sleep to begin with so the additional sleep shortage can lead to deadly consequences.

The time change is linked to an increase in tragic car accidents, according to a Stanford University, which looked at two decades of data.

Also, adults who miss out on even one hour of sleep a day are more likely to report health problems like diabetes, depression and heart disease. That's compared to those who get the recommended seven to eight hours of sleep every night.

You should use this weekend to reset your sleep habits to make sure you are getting enough.

CHANGE YOUR SMOKE, CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTORS

You should take the time to change out the batteries in your smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms this weekend, too. The Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends changing the batteries when you change your clock.

Daylight Saving Time ends Sunday November 4 at 2 a.m.