Tropical Storm Rina forms in Atlantic, no threat

Tropical Storm Rina forms in Atlantic, no threat
Rina became a tropical storm on Monday night, well east of Bermuda with max winds of 40 miles per hour.
Rina became a tropical storm on Monday night, well east of Bermuda with max winds of 40 miles per hour.

SOUTH MISSISSIPPI (WLOX) - Tropical Depression Nineteen in the Atlantic has strengthened and has become Tropical Storm Rina.

On Monday night, T.S. Rina was located hundreds of miles east of Bermuda and was slowly moving northward. Forecasters expect Rina to remain at tropical storm strength, taking a track to the north, not affecting any land.

"Thankfully, Rina poses no threat to the Gulf Coast or our entire nation," said WLOX First Alert Meteorologist Wesley Williams on Monday. "But, it just goes to show you that hurricane season isn't over yet."

"Even though the official end of the season occurs on November 30, sometimes the weather doesn't care and still forms storms anyway," Williams continued. "We'll have to see what happens."

"Keep in mind that the 2017 hurricane season has been the most active since the infamous season of 2005... the year of Katrina," said Williams. "And, remember, in 2005 storms kept on forming in December and even January, well past the official end of hurricane season," said Williams. "We even had to start naming those post-season storms with Greek letters because we ran out of names on the traditional alphabet list."

"Hopefully, 2017's season wraps up when it's supposed to," Williams said. "Because it's been a wild ride."

Don't forget, you can always visit our Hurricane Center or the National Hurricane Center for the latest tropics anytime.

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