EMA director: 'People listened, the plan worked'

EMA director: 'People listened, the plan worked'
Harrison County Emergency Management Director Rupert Lacy grateful to see that south Mississippians took the storm seriously.(Image Source: WLOX News)
Harrison County Emergency Management Director Rupert Lacy grateful to see that south Mississippians took the storm seriously.(Image Source: WLOX News)

HARRISON COUNTY, MS (WLOX) - From coast to coast, south Mississippi felt Hurricane Nate's fury. The powerful wind and rain from the storm did quite a bit of rearranging.

"It was kind of hard to tell where the water got up to until we opened this office door this morning. As you can see we have a water line," said Stephen Threadgill, who is guest services manager at Shaggy's.

Shaggy's seafood restaurant in the Pass Christian harbor took on about three feet of water, but Threadgill says they were able to quickly cleanup and re-open.

"We've had several storms and tropical depressions here. We actually got off really light this time," said Threadgill.

Debris scattered along the beach and in the harbors. Residents used the dry and sunny day to clean up what Nate left behind. Harrison County Emergency Management Director Rupert Lacy is grateful to see that south Mississippians took the storm seriously.

"People listened, the plan worked, and that's what we're happy for," said Lacy.

Emergency management crews worked quickly and efficiently to get everything in place as Hurricane Nate raced toward the coast. It's reportedly one of the fastest moving hurricanes to hit the area.

"We try not to panic, and we're still hoping that Nate would not, but Nate decided to make the approach to Mississippi and Alabama," said Lacy.

During a damage assessment meeting, Southern District Public Service Commissioner Sam Britton commended south Mississippi emergency management officials on a job well done.

"That was a real storm. What you need to think about is the professionalism of those people down on the coast, and the work they did to make sure to keep everybody safe, because it doesn't happen by accident," said Britton.

Lacy adds that a comprehensive damage assessment is still being done. The Sand Beach Authority is already estimating about $550,000 worth of damage, that's including several piers.

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