Law enforcement training takes on new meaning after VA shooting - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Law enforcement training takes on new meaning after VA shooting

K9 training was part of the agenda at the Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers Association program in D'Iberville on Wednesday. (Photo source: WLOX) K9 training was part of the agenda at the Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers Association program in D'Iberville on Wednesday. (Photo source: WLOX)
D'IBERVILLE, MS (WLOX) -

It’s a dirty job, but somebody had to draw the short straw. K9 officer Matt McCain of Flowood Police Department got to be one of the bad guys for the police dogs.

“It's a lot of fun,” McCain said. “They bite really hard, and it’s hot and sweaty and tiring, but it’s a lot of fun. We enjoy it a lot.”

While motorcycles have been making big noise this week, on this day, the barks were just as loud.

McCain said K9 officers are like their four-legged partners.

“Very aggressive. We’re about as aggressive as these dogs around here hunting the criminals and doing the stuff that a lot of people don't want to do,” said McCain.

The training in D’Iberville was scheduled way in advance, but the shooting in Virginia involving members of Congress and capitol police has confirmed for officers here why preparation is so important.

“We always think it’s necessary, whether it’s a good day or a bad day. But, it was a bad day in Virginia,” McCain said.

K9 work, said officer Richard Chandler, is as important as any.

“They’re the ones we call all the time to do some of the most dangerous jobs in law enforcement,” Chandler said. “It’s a much more dangerous world that we live in today than it was yesterday, unfortunately. And so, the training that we do as far as keeping these officers alive and getting home is very important.”

Nick Calico, President of the Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers Association, said preparation needs to be done all the time.

“That’s why we do this training,” Calico said. “You never know what kind of situation you're going to be in, and you always have to rely back on your training.”

“We’re the wolves that protect the sheep. So, whenever the bad stuff happens, we've got to run in, and, unfortunately for our families, sometimes we don't get to come out,” added Clifton Brown, with the West Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office.

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