High blood pressure in African Americans linked to segregated ar - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

High blood pressure in African Americans linked to segregated areas

New research links segregated neighborhoods and African Americans' high blood pressure. (Source: stevepb/Pixabay) New research links segregated neighborhoods and African Americans' high blood pressure. (Source: stevepb/Pixabay)
Chart reveals the stages of high blood pressure in adults. (Source: Nat'l Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH) Chart reveals the stages of high blood pressure in adults. (Source: Nat'l Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH)

(RNN) - Black adults who moved from racially segregated to integrated neighborhoods experienced a significant decrease in their blood pressure, a result that could cause fewer strokes and heart attacks, a study found.  

Researchers said the study, published in the May issue of "JAMA Internal Medicine," was the first to consider a link between residential segregation and blood pressure.

A rise in African American adults' blood pressure, the study said, is associated with living in racially segregated neighborhoods. 

"Our study suggests that the stress and the inadequate access to health-promoting resources associated with segregation may play a role in these increases in blood pressure," David Goff, a researcher at the National Institutes of Health, said in a news release

The doctor said health-promoting resources include grocery stores, recreation centers and health care clinics. 

Researchers read the blood pressure of 2,280 blacks aged 18 to 30 first in 1985 and 1986 and repeatedly over the next 25 years.

The people who had the most significant improvements had moved to less segregated neighborhoods from highly segregated ones. 

The drop in their systolic blood pressure (top number) of 3 to 5 mm Hg is described as "a powerful effect" by the lead author, Kiarri Kershaw, an assistant professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. 

“In terms of impact, just 1 mm Hg of reduction of the systolic blood pressure at the population level could result in meaningful reductions in heart attacks, strokes and heart failure,” she said. 

Copyright 2017 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved. 

  • Latest health & fitness newsLatest health & fitness newsMore>>

  • VA study shows parasite from Vietnam may be killing vets

    VA study shows parasite from Vietnam may be killing vets

    Tuesday, November 21 2017 4:11 PM EST2017-11-21 21:11:31 GMT
    Thursday, November 23 2017 1:04 AM EST2017-11-23 06:04:08 GMT

    A half century after serving in Vietnam, hundreds of veterans have a reason to believe they may be dying from a silent bullet _ test results show some men may have been infected by a slow-killing parasite while...

    More >>

    A half century after serving in Vietnam, hundreds of veterans have a reason to believe they may be dying from a silent bullet _ test results show some men may have been infected by a slow-killing parasite while fighting in the jungles of Southeast Asia.

    More >>
  • Opioid crisis cost $504B in 2015, higher than once thought

    Opioid crisis cost $504B in 2015, higher than once thought

    Monday, November 20 2017 4:40 AM EST2017-11-20 09:40:41 GMT
    Wednesday, November 22 2017 6:22 PM EST2017-11-22 23:22:46 GMT
    The White House says the true cost of the opioid drug epidemic in 2015 was $504 billion, slightly over half a trillion dollars.More >>
    The White House says the true cost of the opioid drug epidemic in 2015 was $504 billion, slightly over half a trillion dollars.More >>
  • Nearly half of US cancer deaths blamed on unhealthy behavior

    Nearly half of US cancer deaths blamed on unhealthy behavior

    Tuesday, November 21 2017 12:43 PM EST2017-11-21 17:43:30 GMT
    Wednesday, November 22 2017 6:22 PM EST2017-11-22 23:22:31 GMT
    Cigarette smoking, over-eating and other unhealthy behaviors can be blamed for nearly half of U.S. cancer deaths each year, according to a new study.More >>
    Cigarette smoking, over-eating and other unhealthy behaviors can be blamed for nearly half of U.S. cancer deaths each year, according to a new study.More >>
Powered by Frankly