Nurses learn how to survive active shooter situation - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Nurses learn how to survive active shooter situation

Nurses acting out an active shooter situation. (Photo source: WLOX News) Nurses acting out an active shooter situation. (Photo source: WLOX News)
BILOXI, MS (WLOX) -

Learning life saving skills for active shooter situations is important, because you never know when those scary moments may happen. On Tuesday, several nurses tackled training that pushed their limits and could save lives.

Nurses with the Mississippi Nurses Association don't have to guess how they would act in an active shooter situation, because now they know. 

"We learned a lot of exciting things today about workplace violence or things we can do to deter an active shooter," said Phyllis Johnson, who is the Director of Advanced Practice and Investigations at the Mississippi Board of Nursing.  
 
Michael Street is a training coordinator for Specialized Emergency Response Training, or S.E.R.T, a company that offers training on workplace violence. 
He has first hand experience. Street was one of the first responding officers in the Lockheed Martin shooting in Meridian. His training offered these nurses the history of active shooters. 

"Your shooters have one goal in mind, and that's to have as big a mass killing as possible. So, they are looking for the big crowds, looking for those big groups, and they are looking for easy targets," said Street. 

The two most important things he said you should have is awareness and a survival mindset. He ran several drills to teach these nurses how to shelter in place using everyday items like a table, purse straps, and a belt to fortify a room. That's something that could help them to stop a shooter or at least buy time in a real situation.

"A shooter knows he only has about 10 to 15 minutes of time to complete his mission," said Street. 

Shannon Pippin got the unfortunate role of an active shooter. Each time he walked in the room, he was distracted and then taken down. 

"Physically, it stopped me in my tracks. A lot of the other aspects of it come into a dark room and all the other aspects of distracting, it was very intimidating to walk in," said Pippin. 

Street said one of the biggest mistakes people make in an active shooter situation is move from a secure place to a less secure location, ultimately showing themselves to the shooter. 

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