Injured deer receives life-saving treatment - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Injured deer receives life-saving treatment

This young deer was hit by a car, and a good Samaritan brought her in. (Photo source: WLOX) This young deer was hit by a car, and a good Samaritan brought her in. (Photo source: WLOX)
While they're at the hospital, Wild at Heart Rescue is also picking up a squirrel that's on the mend. (Photo source: WLOX) While they're at the hospital, Wild at Heart Rescue is also picking up a squirrel that's on the mend. (Photo source: WLOX)
SOUTH MISSISSIPPI (WLOX) -

They work around the clock saving the lives of pets at Gulf Coast Veterinary Emergency Hospital in Woolmarket, but their life-saving care goes beyond beloved pets. 

Dr. Alice Xenachis is one of four veterinarians and numerous technicians at Gulf Coast Veterinary Emergency Hospital. She works unheard of hours to most of us to make sure there's emergency care available for pets.  

While you expect to see dogs and cats at a veterinarian's office, this young deer is less expected. She was hit by a car, and a good Samaritan brought her in.

"She had head trauma from being hit by a car, and then she couldn't walk and couldn't see at all," said Xenachis.

Xenachis said this case is not unusual. She said the veterinarian hospital takes care of a few deer every month and some type of wildlife almost every day.

"Some days more than others, but we accept them 24/7," said Xenachis. 

Here at the emergency hospital, they cover the cost of wildlife care until the animal is well enough to go to a wildlife rescue facility. Missy Dubuisson is the director of Wild at Heart Rescue. 

"This baby deer had to have IV fluids to get it out of shock, and when they're ready to go, they give us a call and let us know we can come get them," said Dubuisson.

That day has arrived for this young deer. Dubuisson and her helper, Abigail Marshall, picked up the skittish deer to move it to a more deer friendly environment for the rest of its recovery. 

"I'll tube feed her to get her nutrition needs taken care of. When she's well enough, this baby will go with our other deer and do deer things," said Dubuisson.

They covered its eyes to calm the deer down. Dubuisson said that's the only way to safely move it for the trip.

While they're at the hospital, they're also picking up a squirrel that's on the mend. 

"This baby will go to one of our squirrel rehab volunteers. We have about 50 squirrels now being cared for," said Dubuisson.  

As Xenachis bids farewell to her wildlife patients, she says it's all in a day's work at the emergency hospital.  

"It just makes me happy to be able to help them," said Xenachis.

A few days after being picked up, the young deer is now eating on its own, and Dubuisson said she should be able to move outdoors soon with other deer and eventually be released.

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