The peak of hurricane season arrives - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

The peak of hurricane season arrives

SOUTH MISSISSIPPI (WLOX) -

Sept. 10 is statistically considered the peak of hurricane season. As of the peak of hurricane season this year, we've had eight named storms.

The average number of named storms we have each hurricane season is 12, so we are still below average. But based on past years, could we see more storms into the rest of hurricane season?

While statistically we may not see as much hurricane activity in the months of October and November, it doesn't mean we wouldn't see a storm develop. However, activity in the tropics decreases a good bit as we enter into the final two months of the season.

This season has been pretty active compared to the last few years for the continental United States, as three of these named storms have made landfall.

Tropical Storm Bonnie weakened to a tropical depression as it made landfall in South Carolina back in May, Tropical Storm Colin made landfall in the big bend region of Florida in early June, and Hurricane Hermine made landfall in the big bend region of Florida at the beginning of September.

As of Saturday evening there are three systems being tracked in the tropics, reminding us of why this time of year is considered the peak with all of the activity.

One system being tracked is in the Gulf of Mexico, but has a lot of things working against it and only has a 10 percent chance of development over the next five days.

Another system is located just northwest of Puerto Rico and also only has a 10 percent chance of development over the next five days.

The third system we are watching is located in the center of the Atlantic Ocean, and it has a high chance of development over the next 5 days at 90 percent. 

"As of Saturday night, none of these systems look to bring a big threat to the United States, but we will continue to monitor them closely as things could change," said Meteorologist Andrew Wilson.

Over the past five years no named systems have made landfall in the continental United States past the peak of the season. Even so, that doesn't mean it couldn't still happen with another two and a half months left in the season, so it is important to stay prepared.

"We are still within hurricane season through Nov. 30, and while Sept. 10 is the peak, we can't let our guard down too much," said Wilson. "Take this time to recheck your hurricane action plan to make sure you are ready if a storm does threaten our area."

Remember, you can check your hurricane plan by going to the Hurricane Center on WLOX.com and clicking the Make Your Hurricane Plan story.

Copyright 2016 WLOX. All rights reserved. 

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