Rocket booster makes its way to INFINITY Science Center; shuts down I-10

Rocket booster makes its way to INFINITY Science Center; shuts down I-10
Saturn V's were used to land men on the moon from 1966 to 1973. (Photo source: WLOX)

HANCOCK COUNTY, MS (WLOX) - Those visiting the INFINITY Science Center will soon be greeted by five towering rocket engines attached to the last remaining piece of Apollo space flight hardware.

It's all part of an effort to tell the story of the iconic Apollo missions and highlight South Mississippi's role in the space program.

The largest piece of the puzzle is the Saturn V first stage rocket booster. The booster is the last remaining piece of hardware from the Apollo missions.

Saturn V's were used to land men on the moon from 1966 to 1973.  The booster was supposed to be used on the Apollo 19, but that mission was canceled.

For the past 45 years, it's been held in outside storage. Monday, it will be relocated to the science center from the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, LA.

The booster was first loaded onto a barge at the Michoud Assembly Facility's docks. It then traveled through a canal system to the Pearl River. It traveled 40 miles by water to NASA's Stennis Space Center. Once at Stennis, the booster will be unloaded from the barge. Then, it will travel by road and along Interstate 10 before arriving at INFINITY.

At midnight when it starts to make it's final transport, I-10 will be shut down in both directions, and traffic will be diverted to Hwy. 90. This is expected to last up to 2 a.m. Tuesday morning.

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