DMR: Cold weather knocking out red tide toxins - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

DMR: Cold weather knocking out red tide toxins

DMR spokeswoman Melissa Scallan said this recent snap of cold weather appears to be knocking out the toxins, but scientists are still testing the waters daily. (Photo source: WLOX) DMR spokeswoman Melissa Scallan said this recent snap of cold weather appears to be knocking out the toxins, but scientists are still testing the waters daily. (Photo source: WLOX)
MISSISSIPPI SOUND (WLOX) -

We have been checking with the Department of Marine Resources to stay up to date on the red tide issue in the Mississippi Sound. Here’s what we found out Tuesday.

DMR spokeswoman Melissa Scallan said this recent snap of cold weather appears to be knocking out the toxins, but scientists are still testing the waters daily.

The latest testing offshore found toxin levels at  less than 5,000 parts per liter. About a week ago, that same area tested at more than 700,000 parts per liter.

Scallan said more cool weather could help to fully knock out the toxins.

Unfortunately, oyster season won’t reopen anytime soon. Joe Jewell, also with the DMR, reported at the last Commission on Marine Resources’ meeting that it could be March or April before the season reopens.

That’s because the DMR has to go through an extensive protocol of testing, which includes sending oyster tissue samples off to a lab in Florida for testing.

Copyright 2016 WLOX. All rights reserved. 

  • DMR: Cold weather knocking out red tide toxinsMore>>

  • South Mississippi scientists weigh in on Red Tide

    South Mississippi scientists weigh in on Red Tide

    Monday, December 14 2015 7:40 PM EST2015-12-15 00:40:15 GMT
    Tuesday, December 15 2015 6:54 AM EST2015-12-15 11:54:08 GMT
    Mississippi beaches are closed and the oyster season is shut down. But it's not because our water is dirty. Gulf Coast Research Lab Director Dr. Monty Graham said what's happening is a natural occurrence known as a Red Tide, or harmful algal bloom. More >>

    Mississippi beaches are closed and the oyster season is shut down. But it's not because our water is dirty. Gulf Coast Research Lab Director Dr. Monty Graham said what's happening is a natural occurrence known as a Red Tide, or harmful algal bloom. 

    More >>
Powered by Frankly