Katrina debris removed from Clermont Harbor - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Katrina debris removed from Clermont Harbor

Those who live in the area say a cleaner harbor and bayou will also be more inviting to visitors. (Photo source: WLOX News) Those who live in the area say a cleaner harbor and bayou will also be more inviting to visitors. (Photo source: WLOX News)
HANCOCK COUNTY, MS (WLOX) -

An old washing machine, several boats and couple of bath tubs were among the debris removed from the marshes of Clermont Harbor in Hancock County.

More than 10 years after Katrina, much storm debris still litters the marshlands of Hancock County. A joint clean-up effort in Clermont Harbor targeted the mess left behind after the storm. 

“Everything out there from boats to appliances to car parts. You name it. Anything that came out of people's homes, ended up in this harbor,” said Craig Clement, with the Clermont Harbor Civic Association.

Mississippi Power, Coast Electric, the City of Waveland and Hancock County's beautification committee are among the partners for the clean-up.

“We're very appreciative to everybody involved and look forward to other developments here with Clermont Harbor itself and the Clermont Harbor community,” said Clement.

Waveland officials hope to follow up the effort with similar clean-up projects throughout the city. 

“We're looking too, in the future, trying to do some clean up in the City of Waveland. We have a lot of boats and debris still in our woods,” said Don Siebenkittel, beautification director for the City of Waveland.

The clean-up effort is about more than just making the place look good. There are also significant environmental benefits. 

“Any marshland or wetland area that works as kind of an environmental filter. So this area drains into the Gulf of Mexico. And it's important to get the debris out of there so the pollution is not so bad,” said Courtney Vanderschaaf with Mississippi Power Company.

Those who live in the area say a cleaner harbor and bayou will also be more inviting to visitors.

“Very nice. Very nice. It's like a hidden resource. And it really could be a lot in the future,” said Clement.

Part of the problem with such marsh clean-ups is getting access. Work crews used airboats and swamp buggies to reach the debris.

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