Oyster fishermen hopeful season holds out longer - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Oyster fishermen hopeful season holds out longer

Oyster season opened two weeks ago with a 10 sack limit for dredgers and seven sacks for tongers. But last week, the DMR increased the tonging limit to 10 sacks a day also. (Photo source: WLOX) Oyster season opened two weeks ago with a 10 sack limit for dredgers and seven sacks for tongers. But last week, the DMR increased the tonging limit to 10 sacks a day also. (Photo source: WLOX)
The executive director of the DMR has the authority to close oyster season when the reefs are depleted. Scientists are monitoring the reefs and the harvest on a daily basis. (Photo source: WLOX) The executive director of the DMR has the authority to close oyster season when the reefs are depleted. Scientists are monitoring the reefs and the harvest on a daily basis. (Photo source: WLOX)
The Pass Christian harbor is not only the place where fishermen unload their fresh catch, it's also the spot where seafood lovers can purchase sacks of fresh oysters. (Photo source: WLOX) The Pass Christian harbor is not only the place where fishermen unload their fresh catch, it's also the spot where seafood lovers can purchase sacks of fresh oysters. (Photo source: WLOX)
The going rate for a sack of oysters is $75. (Photo source: WLOX) The going rate for a sack of oysters is $75. (Photo source: WLOX)
PASS CHRISTIAN, MS (WLOX) -

Oyster fishermen braved choppy seas and chilly temperatures as they worked the reefs early Friday. While shoppers were filling their bags with bargains on Black Friday, commercial fishermen were hoping to fill their sacks with fresh, Mississippi oysters.

This year's limited oyster season opened two weeks ago in Mississippi waters. The crew aboard the Miss Stacy Leigh managed to find its 10 sack limit.

"It's a tiny spot we're working, that's for sure," said Brandon Seal, whose deckhands included his kids, Madison and Jaden.

Daddy is hoping the season will continue through the holidays.

"Yeah, they're pretty oysters. I don't know how long it's going to last though," said Seal, "I don't know. I hope it lasts until Christmas."

"Should hold out a little while," said Pete Esfeller, "Today was just a bad day."

Pete and Derrick Esfeller have had pretty decent luck lately. But Friday's rough seas proved a bit much.

"Today was just a bad day. Kept falling in the boat. Almost fell overboard so we come on in. We've been getting $600 a day besides today. It was just a bad day," said Derrick Esfeller.

The season opened two weeks ago with a 10 sack limit for dredgers and seven sacks for tongers. But last week, the DMR increased the tonging limit to 10 sacks a day also.

Not only is the new Pass Christian harbor the spot where oystermen unload their catch, it's also a place where seafood lovers can buy fresh oysters, right off the boat.

Gulfport's Mike Quigley picked up a sack of fresh oysters Friday. The dockside price was $75 a sack.

"My son is home from the Navy. And he's got two boys with him from Jersey and Illinois. And they're anxious for a taste of the coast,” he explained.

Fishermen are hoping to harvest many more sacks before the DMR closes another limited season.

The executive director of the DMR has the authority to close oyster season when the reefs are depleted. Scientists are monitoring the reefs and the harvest on a daily basis.

Copyright 2014 WLOX. All rights reserved.

  • NEWSMore>>

  • Now: Traffic returns to normal on I-10 near Ocean Springs

    Now: Traffic returns to normal on I-10 near Ocean Springs

    Thursday, August 17 2017 9:11 AM EDT2017-08-17 13:11:44 GMT
    This is the scene on I-10 after a multi-vehicle wrec (Photo Source: MDOT)This is the scene on I-10 after a multi-vehicle wrec (Photo Source: MDOT)

    All lanes of Highway 90 are now open. A Mississippi Highway Patrol spokesman says an 18-wheeler crossed the median on Interstate 10 Thursday morning, causing a deadly series of accidents. It was just before 6:00 a.m. That truck was heading west near the Ocean Springs exit. Suddenly, it veered left, crossed the median and smashed into a motorcycle on the eastbound side of I-10. The MHP spokesman says that motorcycle driver died at the scene.

    More >>

    All lanes of Highway 90 are now open. A Mississippi Highway Patrol spokesman says an 18-wheeler crossed the median on Interstate 10 Thursday morning, causing a deadly series of accidents. It was just before 6:00 a.m. That truck was heading west near the Ocean Springs exit. Suddenly, it veered left, crossed the median and smashed into a motorcycle on the eastbound side of I-10. The MHP spokesman says that motorcycle driver died at the scene.

    More >>
  • Dangerous heat could lead to heat related illness

    Dangerous heat could lead to heat related illness

    Thursday, August 17 2017 8:03 AM EDT2017-08-17 12:03:27 GMT
    Dangerous heat expected across the Mississippi Gulf Coast on ThursdayDangerous heat expected across the Mississippi Gulf Coast on Thursday

    Thursday forecast temperatures are in the low to mid 90s. Not too unusual. But, the heat index will rise to dangerous levels for the first time this summer.

    More >>

    Thursday forecast temperatures are in the low to mid 90s. Not too unusual. But, the heat index will rise to dangerous levels for the first time this summer.

    More >>
  • WLOX Editorial: Louisiana flood solution, not a good deal for South Mississippi

    WLOX Editorial: Louisiana flood solution, not a good deal for South Mississippi

    Wednesday, August 16 2017 4:29 PM EDT2017-08-16 20:29:52 GMT

    We are not strangers to flooding on the Mississippi Coast. Nor are our neighbors to the west in Louisiana. There are forever ongoing efforts, planning and discussions about how to mitigate flooding. But a recent study by the Rand Corporation is more than a little disturbing.

    More >>

    We are not strangers to flooding on the Mississippi Coast. Nor are our neighbors to the west in Louisiana. There are forever ongoing efforts, planning and discussions about how to mitigate flooding. But a recent study by the Rand Corporation is more than a little disturbing.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly