Hinds losing money on housing inmates - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Hinds losing money on housing inmates

RAYMOND, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

Just over 70 percent of the inmates at the Hinds County Detention Center in Raymond were arrested in the City of Jackson, and the city pays the county $3.3 million a year to house those inmates.

"However, it costs us $14 million and some change to operate that facility," says District 4 Supervisor Tony Greer. "What we're doing right now is supplementing everybody else's budget, other cities' budget, the county is doing that, to the tune of $6-9 million a year. I estimated what we've lost since 2007 and I figure that number is somewhere in the $44 million range."

The inmate-subsidizing issue has been brought up before among Hinds County Supervisors. But at next week's meeting, Supervisor Greer plans to ask for action on forging a new,  comprehensive agreement that Jackson, Clinton, Byram and Raymond will all have to sign. He wants each municipality to pay the total estimated cost to house their inmates. He says the additional funds will be enough to service a bond issue for a new, more efficient and secure detention center.

The current agreement is outdated, inadequate, and open-ended, Greer says, and taxpayers deserve more.

"We are going to be prudent with the taxpayers' money. Estimated medical costs for inmates would not be included in each city's fee. That cost would be billed back to the city when it's incurred.

Copyright 2014 MSNewsNow. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
  • New Orleans sits atop an ancient barrier island

    New Orleans sits atop an ancient barrier island

    To the casual observer, this looks like any other section of marsh. However, this spot in extreme Eastern New Orleans-- almost at the St. Tammany Parish line-- is unique. 

    More >>

    To the casual observer, this looks like any other section of marsh. However, this spot in extreme Eastern New Orleans-- almost at the St. Tammany Parish line-- is unique. 

    More >>
Powered by Frankly