Construction causing concerns for east Harrison County residents - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Construction causing concerns for east Harrison County residents

HARRISON COUNTY, MS (WLOX) -

In east Harrison County, construction crews are in the process of moving 300 residents from septic tanks and lagoons to a sewer system.

"Since they started working on the sewer, it has been a big mess out here," resident Barbara Hosli said.

Crews have been working along Hudson Krohn Road for about four months now.

"You can't drive through the road half the time because they are on both sides of the road," Hosli said. "They have no regards to our safety. They had the flagman right on top of each other instead of communicating; it's been a mess."

Hosli is all for the project, but said the construction crews need to be more careful around drivers and communicate with the residents.

"Our neighbors have been stuck in their yard because they left it undone and got stuck in mud because it rained. Just stuff like that; it's bad," Hosli said.

"There has been some complaints because we have a large infrastructure project. It's a growing pain," Harrison County Supervisor Windy Swetman said. "But when they come in, we have a good line of communication with the engineering firm and sub contractors out here, so we can address those immediately so they don't happen again."

Swetman said crews are now going door to door to inform residents when roads will be closed. He also said the flagmen are doing a better job communicating with one another to make sure cars can pass by crews safely.

"This is a project that our office is very engaged in on a weekly and daily matter," Swetman said. "We just want the residents just to be patient with us. This is a great thing for the people of Harrison County."

Since voicing her concerns, Hosli said things have gotten better.

"They do have the flagmen talking better with each other," Hosli said. "They do have walkie talkies now. They didn't have that in the beginning. It was real bad, but it's getting a little better."

The nearly $4 million sewer project should be complete by the beginning of next year.

Copyright 2014 WLOX. All rights reserved.

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