The role issue ads play in political campaigns - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

The role issue ads play in political campaigns

JACKSON, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

Political ads are often flashy and don't hold back on opinions.

If you listen closely, many of those lack approval from a candidate. 

There's a difference in ads from candidates' camps and those that are called issue ads. Liza Looser with the marketing and PR firm Cirlot Agency says the ads are well-calculated.

"The Department of Defense would just really appreciate the strategy that goes behind everything that they do," said Looser.

There have also been issue ads at a local level. One commercial, aimed at Tony Yarber, was released in the recent Jackson mayoral race. His opponent Chokwe Antar Lumumba claimed his campaign had nothing to do with it.

Looser admits issue ads have a bias but claim their purpose should be to better inform the voters.

"A candidate can not be happy with what's going on but they have no control or recourse really to be able to get inside and intercede with that," explained Looser.

Political author and analyst Jere Nash isn't convinced those ad strategies are worth the large amounts of money.

"Voters have sort of gotten wise to them and don't put as much emphasis on the message that's coming in from independent campaigns that they do from messages put out by the candidates," Nash said.

He said it's usually super PACs, political action committees, behind them. Groups that, by law, should have no contact with the candidate's campaign.

Television stations are required to give equal time to ads by the candidates. That rule does not apply for these independent issue ads.

Copyright 2014, MSNewsNow.  All rights reserved.

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