Two people killed in house fire in Miller County, AR - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Two people killed in house fire in Miller County, AR

Harvey Anders, 87, and his wife, Irene Anders, 79, were both killed in a house fire early Monday morning.  The cause of the fire is under investigation. Harvey Anders, 87, and his wife, Irene Anders, 79, were both killed in a house fire early Monday morning. The cause of the fire is under investigation.
MILLER COUNTY, AR (KSLA) -

Two people are dead after an early morning house fire in Miller County, Arkansas.

It happened around 1:30 a.m. Monday morning at a home on Highway 71, near the Louisiana-Arkansas state line.

The Miller County sheriff's Office says a truck driver spotted the flames coming from the home as he was driving by.  

Emergency crews were called to the scene to douse the flames.  It took about 45 minutes to get the fire under control.  Harvey Anders, 87, and Irene Anders, 79, were both inside the home and died in the blaze.  

Caddo Fire District 8 also responded to the call with 3 to 4 unites.  One of the firefighters was Captain Dean Anders.  His brother, Michael Anders, is a fire engineer with the Shreveport Fire Department.

The exact cause of the fire is still under investigation.

Copyright 2013 KSLA.  All rights reserved.

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