How Much Homework Is Too Much? - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

09/29/04

How Much Homework Is Too Much?

It's likely been an ongoing debate since the days of the one room school house. How much homework is too much?

Students often rate their teachers by how much homework they assign. Recently, parents have been debating the merits of homework by sharing opinions in the newspaper. It made us wonder, are today's students overloaded with take home school work?

"Everyone should be doing this, because that means you did your homework," said Biloxi Junior High English teacher, Nicole Moses, as she started class.

The nine year teacher uses homework to reinforce what she covers in the classroom.

"To make sure that they, number one, do well on a test. And number two, they're prepared for class the next day because they know exactly what the teacher expects for them and it shows the teacher they have taught that concept and the students are ready to move on," Moses said.

Christa Glenn has a reputation of not assigning homework. She prefers students make the most of classroom time.

"Now they have 47 minutes they can work on their classroom objectives and we get everything covered in that 47 minutes, they don't have anything to take home with them," said the 8th grade history teacher.

High school students may find themselves with more homework than in years past. Part of the problem is tougher test requirements for "No Child Left Behind".

Pamela Manners is principal at Biloxi High School.

"We try to make sure that they have all the objectives and all the practice that they need to pass the tests. If they don't pass the tests, they don't graduate," she said.

Eleventh grader, Dylan Richmond, says he has just enough homework.

"Maybe an hour or two a night. Usually an hour. I think that's a fair amount for high school students," he said.

"I usually don't have homework," said 10th grader Endia Smith, "because I usually finish it in class."

Parents who believe their children have too much homework should consider scheduling a conference with their child's teacher.

By Steve Phillips

Powered by Frankly