Most of students involved in school bus accident back in class - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Most of students involved in school bus accident back in class

GULFPORT, MS (WLOX) -

Most of the Harrison County middle school students treated after Monday's school bus accident were back in class Tuesday. 

Twenty-four students from North Gulfport 7th and 8th Grade were headed home Monday afternoon when their school bus was involved in an accident with another vehicle. The bus hit a power pole which snapped. Twelve students were transported to area hospitals. 

Harrison County Schools Superintendent Henry Arledge told WLOX News five students did not come back Tuesday. As of 1pm, his office had spoken to the parents of three of the students. 

"The mothers said they were just sore and would be back tomorrow," Arledge said. 

The bus driver was not hurt in the accident which happened at the intersection of Jackson and Indiana Streets at 3:30 Monday afternoon. 

Gulfport police are investigating the accident, but Arledge said he has not seen the police report and had no new details on exactly what happened to cause the accident.

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