Producers: Sound stage investment could lure in film projects - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Producers: Sound stage investment could lure in film projects

GULFPORT, MS (WLOX) -

Two Hollywood producers stopped by the Gulfport City Council meeting this week with great things to say about filming on the Mississippi Coast.

Producer Mark Headley and executive producer Billy Badalato have been on the coast for the last few months filming the movie, Artists Die Best in Black. They told council members that the movie company, and its various employees have put more than $700,000 back into the local economy.

Badalato said they've filmed movies all over the world and Mississippi is by far one of their favorite places to shoot. Headley suggested the coast invest in a movie sound stage to encourage more movie producers to come here.

"We can make much better deals with facilities and vendors and things like that," Headley explained. "Also it's a very picturesque place. The coast is like the riviera of the South."

Those two producers who spoke to the city council tonight are currently working on another project elsewhere that involves actor Robert DeNiro.

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