Jurors hear taped interview of "Marlo Mike" - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Jurors hear taped interview of "Marlo Mike"

Michael Louding, also known as "Marlo Mike" Michael Louding, also known as "Marlo Mike"
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

The first degree murder trial of Michael "Marlo Mike" Louding continued in district court Tuesday.

What could be considered the prosecution's key witness, Detective Elvin Howard of the Baton Rouge Police Department, took the stand. Howard testified he and a fellow police officer interviewed Louding about the shooting death of Terry Boyd back in October 2009.

During the interview, which was played back in court, Louding told detectives Baton Rouge rapper Lil Boosie, whose real name is Torence Hatch, ordered a hit on fellow rapper Chris "Nussie" Jackson.

The video of "Marlo Mike" showed a young man tired of answering question after question regarding his alleged role in the death of Terry Boyd. Finally, he confessed to the murder.

Detective Howard asked, "How many times did you shoot him?"  Louding "About three or four."

Howard: "Who gave you money?" Louding: "Boosie." Howard: "How much?"  Louding: "$2,800."

Louding claimed Hatch said, "Y'all catch that 'n-word' and kill him. Stamp that 'n-word' out."

At times you could see "Marlo Mike" lay his head on the interrogation table.

Defense Attorney Margaret Lagatutta cross examined Detective Howard.

"Did you guys exercise a search warrant on Lil Boosie's house?" asked Lagatutta.  Howard replied that they did. 

"Did you find any guns?" she asked. "No guns were recovered," he answered. "What about his cars?" she asked. "Yes," Howard said.

The trial resumes Wednesday morning and could end as early as Friday.

Copyright 2013 wafb. All rights reserved.

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