FBI sent Boston Marathon evidence to Quantico lab - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

3rd victim in marathon bombing identified as Boston Univ. student

Posted: Updated:
FBI released two photos of the remains of what they suspect to be the bomb that detonated at the Boston Marathon Tuesday. (Source: FBI/CNN) FBI released two photos of the remains of what they suspect to be the bomb that detonated at the Boston Marathon Tuesday. (Source: FBI/CNN)
Krystle Campbell, 29, was identified as one of the people who died from the Boston Marathon bombing. (Source: Facebook) Krystle Campbell, 29, was identified as one of the people who died from the Boston Marathon bombing. (Source: Facebook)
Martin Richard, 8, was one of three people killed in the Boston Marathon bombing Monday. (Source: Richard family/CNN) Martin Richard, 8, was one of three people killed in the Boston Marathon bombing Monday. (Source: Richard family/CNN)
Runners were prevented from finishing the Boston Marathon after bombs exploded near the finish line.(Source: Alexander Sebelen/CNN) Runners were prevented from finishing the Boston Marathon after bombs exploded near the finish line.(Source: Alexander Sebelen/CNN)
Scene from Copley Square at the Boston Marathon where there were explosions at the finish line. (Source: James Bardin) Scene from Copley Square at the Boston Marathon where there were explosions at the finish line. (Source: James Bardin)

BOSTON, MA (RNN) - Boston University said a Chinese graduate student at the school was the third victim killed in the Boston Marathon bombings.

At the request of her family, her name is being withheld by the Chinese Foreign Ministry and Consulate General in New York.

A report from the Associated Press said the family's hometown paper, Shenyang Evening News, named the student on its unofficial microblog.

Another unidentified Chinese student was injured in the blast and is in stable condition following surgery. 

President Obama is scheduled to travel to Boston Thursday to attend a service in honor of the bombing victims, CNN reports.

Boston-area public safety unions are offering a $50,000 reward for information on the attack.

One of the devices that killed three and injured 183 was described by the FBI as a pressure cooker packed with explosive devices and shrapnel.

The Associated Press obtained a photo of the remains of the pressure cooker, charred and twisted. The photo was part of a joint FBI/Department of Homeland Security bulletin.

"What was sent to the FBI laboratory in Quantico, VA were pieces of black nylon, which could be from a backpack, fragments of BBs and nails, possibly contained in a pressure cooker device," said FBI Special Agent Rick DesLauriers. 

DesLauriers went on to say that the bags would have been heavy to carry because of the weight of the contents.

He would not confirm whether a circuit board was found in the evidence. A Boston Globe staffer tweeted investigators found a circuit board they believe was used to trigger the bomb. CNN reported a timer was used to set off the bomb and that detonation by a cell phone was unlikely.

More than 2,000 tips have come into officials, and DesLauriers said they have vetted most of them. He encouraged witnesses to send in video, and asked that businesses not modify any security footage they may have.

"At this time, there are no claims of responsibility. But this is someone's friend, neighbor, coworker or relative," DesLauriers said. "Someone knows who did this."

Meanwhile, Boston area news affiliate WHDH published two photos sent in by a viewer showing the scene before and after one of the bombs exploded.

The first picture shows a crowd of people lined up along the race course with a white bag in front of a barricade.

In the second photo, heavily blurred due to its graphic nature, the bag is not present. The viewer says the photos could have been take an hour or more apart.

The bags described by the FBI were black nylon.

WHDH has turned over the photos to the FBI.

As the FBI continues their investigation, doctors from the Boston Medical Center say patients' conditions are improving.

"Nineteen patients remain and have had 16 operations with five more today, but they are progressing. Seven patients are in critical condition, six are in serious condition and six in fair condition. Patients are progressing, some faster than others and there are still many of these patients who need operations," said Dr. Tracey Dechert with Boston Medical Center. "The patients seem remarkably calm and seem to be handling this very well under the circumstances."

Dechert also described objects removed from some of the patients after the explosions.

"Several patients had fragments removed. Evidence is handled the same each time in a chain of evidence. We've been removing various random things from patients," she said. "We have not seen nails, we have not seen ball bearings. We have just seen particles of metal."

A man questioned in the bombing was cleared of any connection to the attack by authorities.

CNN reported the man, identified as a Saudi national, was "in the wrong place at the wrong time." Police noticed him running from the scene following the explosion, and officials searched his apartment in Revere, MA, overnight.

Meanwhile, the father of the youngest victim, Martin Richard, the 8-year-old killed in the bombing, asked for continued prayers for his family Tuesday.

"My dear son Martin has died from injuries sustained in the attack on Boston," Bill Richard said in a statement. "My wife and daughter are both recovering from serious injuries. We thank our family and friends, those we know and those we have never met, for their thoughts and prayers"

"I ask that you continue to pray for my family as we remember Martin. We also ask for your patience and for privacy as we work to simultaneously grieve and recover. Thank you."

Hundreds gathered for a candlelight vigil to honor Martin, remembering him as a sweet and compassionate boy.

"He was never sad or down," Caitlyn Doyle, babysitter, said. "He was always happy and cheerful and ready to go. He was just all around a wonderful kid. And it's really unfortunate that it had to happen to him at such a young age."

A second victim also has been identified as Krystle M. Campbell, a 29-year-old from Medford, MA. She was at the finish line cheering on a friend when the bombs detonated.

"My daughter was the most lovable girl," her father, William Campbell Jr., told Yahoo. "She helped everybody, and I'm just so shocked right now. We're just devastated. She was a wonderful, wonderful girl. Always willing to lend a hand."

President Barack Obama said the FBI is investigating the bombing as an act of terrorism.

"Any time bombs are used against innocent civilians, it's regarded as an act of terror," the president said.

Obama has been cautious in using the term terrorism when commenting on the incident. He reasserted his pledge to bring those responsible to justice.

"If you want to know who we are, who America is, how we respond to evil - that's it. Selflessly, compassionately, unafraid," he added.

No one has publicly claimed responsibility for the act Monday that took the lives of three people and injured 176.

Officials gave little detail Tuesday on progress in the investigation, instead asking repeatedly for photos, videos and items that may be of help.

"There are no known additional threats," said Rick DesLauriers, FBI special agent in charge. "We continue to interview various witnesses and process the crime scene, which could take some time.

"The citizens of Massachusetts and the city of Boston should expect to see the FBI and its [joint terrorism task force] partners conducting investigative activity in the greater eastern Massachusetts in the Boston area."

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said only two explosive devices had been found by police. Gene Marquez, acting special agent in charge for the ATF Boston Field Division, said confusion on additional devices may have come from "suspect packages that were disrupted."

DesLauriers said they had received "voluminous" amounts of tips already. He also said authorities would not be confined to the immediate area for their investigation.

"This will be a worldwide investigation, we will go where the evidence and leads take us," DesLauriers said. "We'll go to the ends of the earth to identify the subjects or subjects who are responsible for this despicable crime and we will do everything we can to bring them to justice."

CNN reported at least 17 of the injured were in critical condition.

Dr. George Velmahos, chief of trauma surgery at Massachusetts General, said Tuesday said he had performed four amputations on the patients brought to the hospital, all legs above the knee, and two other victims' legs were at risk of requiring it.

"There was such severe trauma they were considered automatic amputees, we just completed what the bomb had done," Velmahos said.

He said the oldest patient they received was 71, the youngest 28 years old. Hospital staff has seen primary injuries from the blast and secondary injuries from the shockwave knocking people into objects.

Dr. Ron Walls, chair of emergency medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, said their youngest patient from the bombing was 16; their oldest was 62.

"I've never been surprised by patients resilience," the doctor said. "The more they're challenged they more they rise."

Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis called it the most complex crime scene in the history of the department. He said the scene began at about 15 blocks after the incident and has been collapsed to 12 blocks.

On Tuesday, a European security official told the Associated Press that evidence so far indicated it was not the work of suicide bombers, although that had not been ruled out.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called the bombings a "cruel act of terror." The White House lowered its flag to half-staff Tuesday.

Massachusetts State Police Superintendent Timothy Alben said people would see an enhanced police presence for days "to provide some comfort to the public."

The marathon is held annually on Patriots Day, a civic holiday, and draws tens of thousands of runners from around the world and hundreds of thousands in spectators.

Around 2:50 p.m. ET, two explosive devices went off within seconds of each other near the finish line at Copley Square. Davis said the explosions were 50 to 100 feet apart.

Frederick Heinemann of Gilbert, AZ, was one of the race's participants. He told Phoenix news affiliate KPHO he was blocks away when it happened and described the moments after as confusing.

"I thought it was something odd but nobody around me was panicking," Heinemann said. "We walked down the street and somebody had a car radio on and the doors open and we were just listening, thinking, 'Oh my God how could that happen.'"

Police ask anyone with information to call 1-800-494-TIPS. Anyone looking for information on loved ones can call 617-635-4500.

Copyright 2013 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow

208 DeBuys Road
Biloxi, MS 39531
(228) 896-1313

FCC Public File
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and WLOX. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.