Jackson described as human trafficking corridor - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Jackson described as human trafficking corridor

Human trafficking, also known as modern day slavery, reportedly earns $35 billion a year. Human trafficking, also known as modern day slavery, reportedly earns $35 billion a year.
JACKSON, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

It is called the second largest and fastest growing criminal industry in the world. Human trafficking, also known as modern day slavery, reportedly earns $35 billion a year.

Jackson residents learned more about human trafficking during a seminar at Greater Antioch Baptist Church Sunday evening. Advocates for Freedom made the presentation and said children as young as 12 are being abducted, sold and forced into prostitution or labor.

"Jackson is the hub for the southeast and they're bringing people from Atlanta, the northeast down through here going toward Texas or from the northwest going toward Florida," explained Susie Harvill Executive Director and Founder of Advocates for Freedom.

Interstate 10, which runs across Mississippi, is described as a major trafficking corridor.

Attendees also heard from a Jackson mother who said her 19-year-old recently became a victim and was missing for six days until she was found by authorities in Florida.

"We'll be talking about developing a routine, being in constant contact with people so if anything happens they'll know where to look, where to start looking, because I didn't have that information when I was going through that," said Selika Corley, mother of a victim and human trafficking advocate.

Senate Bill 2913 on human trafficking addresses the perpetrators and penalties they face.

Copyright 2013 MSNewsNow. All rights reserved.

SIDEBAR: Human trafficking

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