Marine Patrol seizes illegal gill nets, 300lbs Red Drum - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Marine Patrol seizes illegal gill nets, 300lbs Red Drum

MDMR Marine Patrol seized more than 300 pounds of illegal red drum from the 11 gill nets confiscated. MDMR Marine Patrol seized more than 300 pounds of illegal red drum from the 11 gill nets confiscated.
Marine Patrol officers also confiscated 1,310 feet of net. (Photo source: MS Dept. of Marine Resources) Marine Patrol officers also confiscated 1,310 feet of net. (Photo source: MS Dept. of Marine Resources)
HANCOCK COUNTY, MS (WLOX) -

The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources (MDMR) Marine Patrol seized 11 gill nets and 333.3 pounds of illegal red drum (valued at $749.93) from a Hancock County man Friday.

Investigators said Herman William Rieux was removing fish from his nets off east Gulf Street in the Ansley community around 3pm when they caught up with him.

Almost two weeks ago, the Marine Patrol received a tip that Rieux was engaged in illegal netting activity. Friday morning, Officer Tim Broder hid in a nearby marsh area and waited to confront Rieux while he was unloading his boat.

Rieux was cited 11 counts of possession of non-biodegradable gill nets, 11 counts of possession of untagged gill nets, two counts of possession of commercially taken undersized red drum, one count for not having a commercial gill net license and one count of possession of bull red drum exceeding the daily bag limit. Each count is punishable by a fine of $100-$500.

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