Jackson Co. leaders look ahead to new jail, road construction - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Jackson Co. leaders look ahead to new jail, road construction

JACKSON COUNTY, MS (WLOX) -

Jackson County is in good shape. That was the theme of Wednesday's State of the County address before the Pascagoula Rotary Club.

Board of Supervisors President Mike Mangum talked about several projects that will be getting underway this year, including the construction of a new $30 million jail, as well as nine major road and bridge repair projects.

During the past year, the county celebrated its bicentennial and a major overhaul of the Ocean Springs Harbor is just about finished. 

As for money, the county is better off than most.

"We're like everyone else. We're cautiously looking at the economy and what's going on, but we've positioned ourselves with great financial position with our indebtedness is low. We've just got an upgrade on our financial rating to a double A and that's as high as we can get at this time," Mangum said.   

About 100 people attended Wednesday's State of the County address.

Copyright 2013 WLOX. All rights reserved.

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