Group offers reward in cat shooting deaths investigation - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Group offers reward in cat shooting deaths investigation

ETHEL, LA (WAFB) -

A reward is being offered for information related to the shooting deaths of several cats.

The Humane Society of the United States said it is offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of those responsible.

Nearly two dozen cats that had been shot with a .22 caliber rifle were found on Nov. 12 in Ethel. Most of them were dead two days later.

"This is an inexcusable crime that deserves the serious attention of law enforcement and the community," said Julia Breaux, Louisiana state director for The Humane Society of the United States. "It is well documented that those who abuse animals can move on to abuse people, too. We hope our reward helps bring forward information that will help find the heartless person who hurt these innocent creatures."

The 20 or so cats were left at a home by the former renter.

Animal lovers in the community had cared for them.

Copyright 2012 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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