Pink flamingo found living on Horn Island

Pink flamingo wandering with pelicans, terns, and seagulls on Horn Island. Image source: Beth and Randy Pavolini.
Pink flamingo wandering with pelicans, terns, and seagulls on Horn Island. Image source: Beth and Randy Pavolini.
Pink flamingo on Horn Island. Image source: Beth and Randy Pavolini.
Pink flamingo on Horn Island. Image source: Beth and Randy Pavolini.
Pink flamingo on Horn Island. Image source: Beth and Randy Pavolini.
Pink flamingo on Horn Island. Image source: Beth and Randy Pavolini.

HORN ISLAND, MS (WLOX) - Wildlife officials have confirmed the pink flamingo sightings on Horn Island.

Beth and Randy Pavolini said they spotted the flamingo Saturday after making a trip out to the island.

They said the bird was seen near the least tern area and was wandering with the pelicans, terns, and seagulls.

Alison Sharpe, Wildlife Care and Rescue Center Director Alison Sharpe said, she received numerous reports of the flamingo just days after Hurricane Isaac.

Sharpe said she also received reports of flamingos in Hancock County.

"A Horn Island Park Ranger is aware of the flamingo and has observed it. It appears to be eating properly from the information that has been given to us," Sharpe said. "It is able to fly. The bird does not appear to be in distress."

Since it is common for foreign animal species to turn up after a storm, wildlife rescuers said they won't pursue them unless the animals are distressed.

"We end up with several bird species, that you don't typically see until we have tropical storms or hurricanes that blow in," Sharpe said. "They [flamingos] are native to Florida."

Sharpe said, the flamingo is federally protected and she urges anyone who sees the bird or any other species of bird to keep a far distance. Getting to close too the bird could cause undue stress.

"I understand people are in awe when they see these animals, but try to observe them from a distance. Eventually he'll get his bearings and head back down to Florida," Sharpe said.

If you see any animal in distress call the Wildlife Care and Rescue Center at 228-669-2737.

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