Teresa Mayes' mother: 'Adam was a control freak' - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Teresa Mayes' mother: 'Adam was a control freak'

Teresa Mayes Teresa Mayes

(WMC-TV) - Adam Mayes' mother-in-law appeared on the Today Show to talk about Mayes and her daughter Teresa, who is charged with first degree murder and especially aggravated kidnapping in this case.

She also shared her reaction when she heard the news the manhunt for Mayes was finally over.

"My first reaction was ‘Thank God that the little girls were safe and alive and well,'" said Josie Tate on the Today Show.

Tate has a theory about why Mayes murdered JoAnn and Alexandria Bain and kidnapped Alexandria and Kyliyah.

"To have possession of the two children," she said. She also said she often claimed the two girls as his own.

"Do I believe that they were his children? No, they were not his children," she said.

Tate claims Mayes was a brutal, sometimes violent man, who, as a child, maintained control of his parents and later his wife.

"He made her cut off all ties with all of her family. Adam would not even allow Teresa to attend her father's funeral. Adam was a control freak," Tate said.

Tate's initial elation has now turned into panic and fear for her daughter, who faces first degree murder and kidnapping charges. She finds it difficult to accept her daughter's involvement in such a brutal crime.

"Yes it is difficult to accept, but at the same time, I know that she was scared of Adam. I know that she was coerced and manipulated and forced to do the things that she did," Tate said in her daughter's defense.

Copyright 2012 WMC-TV. All rights reserved.

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