Biloxi High Students Get Modern Motivation - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

09/23/03

Biloxi High Students Get Modern Motivation

The Biloxi Police Department brought a motivational message to high school students Tuesday.

But it wasn't your typical public speech at a school assembly. This multi media presentation combined popular culture with serious advice.

"Too many people seem to settle for mediocrity. Just being ordinary," said the announcer on a motivational video playing at Biloxi High.

It takes something extraordinary to capture a teen's attention. The triple DVD display had hundreds of students focused on its motivational messages.

"I thought it was awesome personally. Because it really related to us with our music and our way of life today. And it was just amazing. It really was," said Darby Fayard.

Earl Pruett says the mix of modern music and movie stars appeals to students.

"I think this is great for the student body to learn. This has a lot of strong messages and stuff that we can take for life. And it helps us understand that we have bad decisions to make and we have right decisions to make. And we need to make the right ones," he said.

The kind of high energy mix in the video might drive some adults off the edge, but it seems just the thing for the teenagers. It's motivational marketing with a high school audience in mind.

"Catches their attention you know. Instead of like some of the old movies that have all the old time music and stuff. And this brought it back to our age," said student, Nick Dunlap.

The packaging may be modern, but many of the messages remain the same. The video preached a powerful message about not drinking and driving and avoiding drug use.

It also talks about potential and expectations and thoughtful decision making.

"Make the right decisions and it'll get you far in life," said Dunlap.

The Biloxi Police Department brought the motivational video to the high school. Another version of the video, designed for a younger audience, will be presented at the elementary schools.

By Steve Phillips

Powered by Frankly