Potential Indian artifacts bury plans for seafood museum’s new s - WLOX.com - The News for South Mississippi

Potential Indian artifacts bury plans for seafood museum’s new site

BILOXI, MS (WLOX) -

By Terrance Friday

BILOXI, MS (WLOX) - The City Council made it official Tuesday: Biloxi's Seafood Museum will return to Point Cadet.

"The museum board is in full agreement to move forward as fast as we can with the site at Point Cadet," said Seafood Industry Museum Director Robin Krohn David.

City leaders say members of the Choctaw Indian  Reservation have expressed concern about building on the old Tullis property. Considering the risk of destroying historical artifacts, FEMA sent the city a strong warning.
 
"FEMA advised us that if we appealed, the cost for additional environmental assessment and or mitigation, that it would compromise the timeliness of this project and jeopardize all the funding," said David Staehling, Biloxi's Director of Administration

The city doesn't to risk losing the $6 million FEMA has already committed to the project.
Although all sides agreed abandoning the controversial Tullis site is the right thing to do, Councilman Tom Wall wasn't happy about the decision.

"I'm glad we're going to finally get something moving, but I'm so very disgusted with the whole thing," Wall said.

The site's original location isn't exactly what project coordinators had their hearts set on. Nonetheless, they're happy to have the rebuilding process back on track."

"Instead of going through more months of waiting and fighting and arguing, we just would rather go back to Point Cadet," David said. "And we'll make our programs work from there."

Moving the seafood museum back to Point Cadet will mean slight changes to the plans for the 26,000 square foot building. The new museum should be compete in about two years.

Copyright 2011 WLOX. All rights reserved.

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